Resources

Chiropractic

STUDIES REVEAL EFFECTS OF SPINAL NERVE ROOT COMPRESSION… In 1975 Seth Sharpless, a researcher at The University of Colorado, did a study on the effects of compression at the level of the nerve root. His finding was that only 8-10mmHg of pressure can have profound effects and result in significant conduction block in the nerve root. The weight of a dime on the back of your hand equals about 8-10mmHg of pressure. Sharpless’s finding was confirmed in a 1995 study that found that when a bundle of nerves known as the cauda equina, (these nerves resemble a horse’s tail as they emanate from the low back and tail bone regions), were compressed at their nerve roots at only 10mmHg pressure it resulted in decreased action potentials. In 1992 B.L. Rydevik, a research scientist, found that it took only 5-10mmHg of pressure at the nerve root to interfere with the supply of nutrition to the nerve root. Finally, M. Hause, another researcher, found that pain is not neccesarily present when nerve roots are compressed. Hause’s study also found that with compression there were mechanical changes, circulatory changes, production of inflamatory agents which will produce pain, and disturbed cerebral spinal flow. What the findings of this research mean to you is that, if you have a subluxation in your spine, it can be responsible for the pain you may or may not feel, and the dysfunction you are experiencing. When a vertebra is misaligned it can cause the nerve root to experience increased pressure which in turn can cause you to suffer from all that these researchers found. Sharpless, SK: Susceptibility of spinal roots to compression block. NINCDS Monograph 15, DHEW publication (NIH) 76-998, 1975, pp155-61. Konno S, Olmarker K, Byrod G, et al: Intermittent cauda equina compression. Spine 1995; 20(1):1223. Rydevik, BL: The effects of compression on the physiology of the nerve roots. JMPT 1992;15(1):62. Hause, M: Pain and the nerve root. Spine 1993;18(14):2053. 5.

Instrumentation

TYTRON IMAGING
Paraspinal infrared imaging is an extremely sensitive and accepted method of analysis for the presence of abnormal autonomic neurophysiology (1,2,3,4,5). The data presented in the thermal scan is compared to literature based normative values to determine the extent of neuroprathophysiology (5,6,7). Any paraspinal thermal asymmetry of 0.5 Degrees Celcius or above is indicative of abnormal nervous system function. (5,6,7,8). The higher the asymmetry, the greater the extent of neural dysfunction.

1.) Hobbins, W. Thermography and Pain. Biomedical Thermography, Alan R. Liss, New York. 1982:361-375
2.) Uematsu, S. Thermographic Imaging of Cutaneous Sensory Segment in Patients with Peripheral Nerve Injury – Skin Temperature
Stability Between Sides of the Body. J Neurosurg 1985;62:716-720
3.) Hubbard, J., Hoyt, C. Pain Evaluation in 805 Studies by Infrared Imaging. Thermology 1986;1:161-166
4.) Joint Council of State Neurological Societies of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Council Report – Neurosurgical Clinical Procedure Review of Thermography. Original Report 1988.
5.) Feldman, F., Nickoloff, E. Normal Thermographic Standards in the Cervical Spine and Upper Extremities. Skeletal Radiol 1984;12:235-249
6.) Uematsu, S., Edwin, D., et al, Quantification of Thermal Asymmetry. Part 1: Normal Values and Reproducibility. J Neurosurg 1988;69:552-555
7.) Uematsu,S. Symmetrery of Skin Temperature Comparing One Side of the Body to the Other. Thermology 1985;1:4-7.
8.) Uematsu, S. Edwin D., et al, Quantification of Thermal Asymmetry. Part 2: Application in Low-Back Pain and Sciatica. J Neurosurg 1988;69-556-561
9.) Thermography Protocols – International Thermographic Society 1997
10.) Thermography Protocols – International Academy of Clinical Thermology 2001.

PARASPINAL SKIN TEMPERATURE PATTERNS:
AN INTEREXAMINER AND INTRAEXAMINER
RELIABILITY STUDY
Edward F. Owens, Jr, DC,a John F. Hart, DC,b Joseph J. Donofrio, DC,c Jason Haralambous, DC,d and
Eric Mierzejewski, Dce
Autism, Asthma, Irritable Bowel Syndrome,
Strabismus, Illness Susceptibility: A Study in
Chiropractic Management
William C. Amalu, DC, CCUCS
CONSISTENCY OF CUTANEOUS THERMAL SCANNING
MEASURES USING PRONE AND STANDING PROTOCOLS:
A PILOT STUDY
Richard A. Roy, DC, MSc,a,b Jean P. Boucher, PhD,c and Alain S. Comtois, PhDd
PARASPINAL CUTANEOUS TEMPERATURE MODIFICATION
AFTER SPINAL MANIPULATION AT L5
Richard A. Roy, DC, MSc,a,b Jean P. Boucher, PhD,c and Alain S. Comtois, PhDd
DIGITIZED INFRARED SEGMENTAL THERMOMETRY: TIME
REQUIREMENTS FOR STABLE RECORDINGS
Richard A. Roy, DC, MSc,a Jean P. Boucher, PhD,b and Alain S. Comtois, PhDc